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Group 2: Bolt Tools First, make the different tools needed as guides to drill the holes and hold the piece. It is also possible to bore an 1 8-mm-diameter hole lengthwise through a mm-diameter plain bar, but it requires a pretty big lathe. You may also choose to make the bolt carrier in three parts, as shown in the Expedient Solutions section of this book. Cut the lower part away, according to the drawing. To do it, a milling machine is the easiest solution. If you have none, refer to Expedient Solutions. The next step is to drill the main pin holes.

I recommend drilling the carrier and the bolt together in the same operation. To do it, carefully position the bolt to make sure it is horizontal and tlx It provisionally to the carrier with a small drop of cyanacrylate glue. Since the axis of the pin is not exactly above the diameter of the bolt carrier, you must prevent the drill from slipping to the side. The surest way is to mill the place flat. Once done you can then use a conventional helical twist drill.

Another way is to use a wooden drilling guide with a metallic tube liner tool 2. Step 2 You must now drill the cocking handle hole with its positioning cuts. Mark the position of the hole, by tracing layout lines with the help of the lathe. Then place the piece on the drill press. To hold the piece in the vise, I recommend inserting it into a tube of 34 mm inner diameter, which may be the future receiver itself.

First, drill the 10 mm hole and then enlarge it to 12 mm as shown in the drawing. Step 3 Cut the ejection opening with a milling machine. If you have none, you can first cut the sides of the opening with a hacksaw. After that, you drill a series of adjacent holes along the length of the opening. You can then cut most of the metal away with a chisel. Finish the opening with hand files or with the help of a small grinder driven by a flexible shaft flexade. Step 4 Fix the carrier on the lathe with the help of tool 3.

You can then turn the recess for the front ring and diminish the diameter of the bolt carrier as shown in the drawing to reduce friction. Bolt Carrier Front Ring Drawing This part of the bolt requires a heat-treatable steel and must be hardened. The easiest way is to purchase a bar of 34 mm diameter and then cut it to length. Next locate and drill the four holes with the help of the guiding tool tool 1. Then drill the countersink for the three screw heads. Take the ring on the lathe and turn the inner 24 mm diameter recess.

Cut the main spring abutment place either with an appropriate tool or file it off. Finally cut the opening for the main spring guide rod. Bolt Drawing If you have access to a milling machine, I suggest that you first mill a 1 8-mm-diameter steel bar to the preliminary shape shown in the drawing. The bar should be long enough to make four to five pieces or more. Take the piece on the lathe and drill the firing pin hole all the way through. Mark the ejector hole position on the lathe layout lines and drill it on the drill press.

Because the drill may wander, begin from the front face. Next drill tho holes fer the extraetor axis pin and spring. Put the bolt back on the lathe and turn the cartridge head recess out. Then tap the firing pin hole. Main Pins Drawing Make these parts out the toughest steel you can obtain.

You must take care to work according to close tolerances because these pins should not move freely in their locations, but rather should be hammered in place a press fit. Extractor Drawing This small piece is made out of tough heat-treatable steel. If you are building a single gun, or just a few. The extractor should engage the cartridge head smoothly to prevent losing too much energy from the slamming bolt. The axis pin is inserted from above, and its superior end deformed by hammering to prevent it from falling.

The coil spring is made out of standard commercial stock. This piece must be hardened. A commercial M4 Allen screw located just behind blocks it in the correct position. Cocking Handle Drawing This part is easy to make on a lathe and does not require special instructions. Take special care to cut the flat sides exactly parallel with the positioning stud hole. You can choose another solution if you want; for example, you can file one side flat. You may also use a steel ball in place of the positioning stud.

In this case crimp the opening with an appropriate tool. You may want to build a semiauto-only version of the gun. To do so, just limit the length of the selectors cut to 46 mm. Front and Back Plates Drawing The front and back plates are made out of 5-mm-thick soft steel. The plates are then welded to the housing.

Hooks Drawing These two parts have the very important task of holding the upper and lower parts of the gun together. They must be hard enough to resist deformation in spite of many repetitions of assembly and disassembly. Therefore, do not use soft steel sheet; choose a tough alloyed brand. Forge and control the adjustment by assembling the trigger mechanism housing to the receiver. After this, the hooks are hardened and tempered. Group 4: Trigger Mechanism Drawing through Small Parts Make ttie sear, seat plunger, disconnector, selector, and axis pin T6 out of tough heat-treatablo Steel.

The trigger arm can be made out soft steel, as can the trigger itself and the rivets T3. These parts are relatively easy to build with files, a drill press, and a lathe. The front side of the trigger should be rounded to make it more comfortable for the finger. Adjust the disconnector hook and the sear. For small- or large-scale production use the test bed shown in drawing at the back of the book. Trigger and Sear Axis Pin These two pieces are interchangeable and made out of heat-treatable steel. They are held in place by a small spring engaged in their groove, as shown in illustrations.

This spring is made out of 0. It is held in place between the side of the housing and a self-locking nut, on the transverse screw limiting the movement of the sear.

HOME WORKSHOP GUNS FOR DEFENSE & RESISTANCE, VOL. V

This screw should be hardened if possible. The trigger and the sear are maintained in place on the other side by the small cylindrical spacer T8. For mass production the best solution is, of course, a molded hard plastic grip, with or without metal inserts depending of the kind of plastic used. You may choose either to cast a resin and fiberglass grip or build a conventional steel sheet one, with wooden side plates.

The steel sheet version will be described here; for the resin and fiberglass version see Appendix A. Construction First cut a 1. Inside dimensions are critical; therefore, you must first make a form block corrosponding to the magazine you are going to use. Drawing gives the dimensions for a STEM magazine. To build a single piece, use the form block of drawing and a vise. For small-scale production use the forming die shown in drawing According to the equipment you have available, braze or weld the rear lips together.

With a hammer and an anvil, with better or without the help of a torch, deform the small bridges at the lower end of the magazine housing to build the passage for the magazine depth stops. Then make the small U-shaped piece to support the magazine catch. Weld or braze it to the grip. Try to insert the grip in the trigger housing; some adjustment with a file may be necessary. Try to insert the magazine; adjust as needed with a file. The magazine should be able to be inserted and removed without At this point verify the position of the magazine on the gun, but take care: it is the most essential adjust- ment to ensure a smooth feeding and positive ignition of the cartridge.

The mag- azine's lips must not touch the bottom of the bolt but should be as high as pos- sible. The bolt must strip the round from the magazine to push it into the chamber. Try it with a dummy cartridge. You may adjust to get the correct position by filing the top of the side slots If you have already gone too far, pull the pistol grip out.

Pistol grip. Magazine Latch Spring Drawing The spring is a conventional commercial compression coil spring. You may use the same brand as the main spring. The spring guide is maintained in place on the magazine latch by a small deformation of its end formed by hammering. It should be done only after the magazine latch has been hardened. Side Plates Drawing Both should be made out the same hardwood.

Walnut is the best choice, but you may use another. You should first machine the wood to the preliminary L-shape shown in the drawing. The piece is then formed with a saw and the help of a template. For the prototype, I used the following solution. Resin-impregnated glass fabric formed the front and inner sidee of the grip, and the wooden side plates were epoxied onto it. The separation between the two wooden halves was left free, so the finished grip could open like an oyster at its rear side see Illustration G. Finish it with a rasp and a buffer. The retainer screw acts also as axis pin for the magazine latch.

To drill its location, put the wooden left side plate in place on the pistol grip and use the axis pin holes as guides. Proceed the same way for the right side. Now you have to drill the recesses for the screw head on the right half and for the nut on the left half. I suggest using a self-locking nut. Group 6: Sights Drawing through The front and rear sights are both made out of the same basic module.

To build the basic module you need a U-shaped steel profile 20 x 20 mm, 2 mm thick. You can also make it out of 20 x 20 mm square steel tube. Bend the metal strip with the help of tool 4. Mark the position for the rivets on the strip and drill them. You must ensure a tight adjustment around the tube. Then rivet the two pieces together. The parts specific to the front and rear sights are very simple and are self-explanatory.

The front sight is assembled on the gun. Caution: This screw should not protrude inside the receiver. The rear sight assembly is made according the same principles. Group 7: Folding Stock Drawing through The folding stock is made out of commercial square tubes. The only difficulty is that the stock itself must slide smoothly into the rear tube, but not be loose.

The stock should engage the retaining stud when pushed in its foremost position. Releasing it will let it return under spring pressure and be locked. When firing at the hip, the shooter uses the stock butt as a foregrip. Group 8: Handguard and Front Grip Drawing and These parts may be made either from hardwood or some kind of plastic material.

Drawing shows one of the simplest and easiest wooden solutions. You may, of course, choose another better-looking one, which would require more time to manufacture. As for the pistol grip, I suggest reinforcing the inner surfaces with glass bedding. Tool 2 Drawing This tool is only necessary if you have no milling machine. Use hard plastic, as indicated, or hardwood for the block. Fasten the steel liner to the block with epoxy or similar adhesive. Tool 3 Drawing This device is useful for the fourth construction step of the bolt carrier. You may use brass instead of steel.

You will test the ignition with primer. Use a fired cartridge case resized with an appropriate reloading tool. Primers are commercial reloading components. It is to be used with the help of a heavy vise. Use the spacers T8 to position the sear and trigger assembly. When the mechanism works correctly, assemble it in the trigger mechanism housing and pistol grip assembly. With the selector at the rear position, it should be impossible to move the trigger.

With the selector at the middle position, you pull the trigger and the disconnector lowers the sear until it is brought back out of engagement; the sear then springs up. With the selector at the foremost position, you pull the trigger all the way back. The disconnector remains engaged to the sear. Now assemble the trigger mechanism housing to the receiver without the bolt and barrel. Looking from the front of the body, observe the sear. As you pull the trigger with the selector in both semiauto or full-auto position the sear should completely clear the bolt way, but return high enough to catch the bolt once the trigger is released or the disconnector disengaged.

Weapons & Warfare

If necessary, adjust the sear. Then assemble the gun completely, with bolt and barrel. Retract the bolt to its firing position. With the selector set at serriiaulo, pull the trigger to lei Uie bolt fly forward and, without releasing it, pull the bolt handle all the way back. The bolt should remain to the rear. If you release the trigger, it will return to the firing position, and, if you puli it again, the bolt will fly forward.

If the selector is set at full auto, the bolt will not remain at the rear during that operation. Load one inert dummy cartridge in the magazine and fire. The gun should chamber the round smoothly. Sharply pull the bolt handle all the way back, and the round should fly away through the ejection port. Inspect the case for any abnormal sign of wear; for example, on the rear face where the extractor snaps on the cartridge head. Once the gun feeds and ejects inert rounds correctly, test it with primer-only dummy rounds. These rounds are useful to test the ignition process in the workshop, without necessitating a trip to the shooting range.

Top right Accuracy teshng at the shooting range. Right Testing at 25 meters at the range. When selecting a place to test the gun with live rounds, you must pay attention to the ordinary security measures usual with handgun shooting. Keep in mind also that any submachine gun recoils during full-auto fire and that the bullets tend to go to the right and up. The cap will be crushed by the firing pin before the round is fully cham- bered.

Small brass particles will fly through the ejection px rt. You must wear pro- tective goggles and keep any bystanders away from the right side of the gun. First load only one round, set the selector at semiauto, aim. If all works correctly, the gun will fire, the empty case will be ejected, and the bolt will remain to the rear.

Above: Results of five shots shoulder-fired on semiauto In 10 seconds at a distance of 25 meters. If the gun fails to fire, check and eventually modify the firing pin or the extractor. If the bolt is not caught by the sear, check the trigger mechanism again see above. Determine what is causing the malfunction and make the necessary modifications. If everything worked correctly with a single round, load three cartridges.

Fire them on semiauto. Try with five rounds and then a full magazine. Be careful: there is a small risk that the amount of friction generated by the magazine spring under full pressure will not allow the bolt to travel far enough to the rear to be caught by the sear; the gun will then fire some rounds at full auto. If that happens, modify the gun by thoroughly polishing the underpart of the bolt and the contact surfaces of the bolt carrier.

The moving parts should be well lubricated. When the gun functions correctly at semiauto, test it at full auto, first with a few rounds and then with a full magazine. MAGAZINE Because magazines may come from various manufacturers and may be in questionable condition, test the gun with many of them and discard those that cause problems.

The elevation is corrected by screwing or unscrewing the Allen screw that acts as front sight. Side deviation is corrected by laterally displacing the L-shaped back sight. I suggest a rough adjustment at 10 meters and a fine tuning at 25 or 50 meters. Once adjusted, the back sight is secured by the self-locking nut, and the front one by a drop of epoxy. In fact, It is probably an illegal fighting weapon that should be hidden most of the time.

The only thing that you must do is to treat the metal and wooden parts to protect them against humidity and rust. Unless the wood is very dense, a filler should be use to fill the 25 pores. After drying, the excess filler is removed with fine sandpaper.

To treat the wood, then apply protective oil or another currently available high-quality product according to the manufacturer's directions. Until recently, paint was seldom used for firearms, but now more and more military weapons are protected with new very resistant synthetic coatings. I highly recommend using paint because of the wide availability of high-quality and relatively cheap commercial products.

For the prototypes I used a black high-temperature-resistant paint designed for automobile exhaust pipes. The paint was also resistant to the lubricating grease and oil used on the gun. You may choose between the bluing process, which creates a microscopic sheet of black ferrous oxide, and phosphatization, which gives gray iron- phosphate. If you prefer a conversion coating, please refer to Appendix B. There are any number of books that tell how to fashion a sling, so there is no need to provide instructions here.

A leather or nyhn sling may be added. The removal of these plugs is not as easy as with threaded ones. To do it you will need the takedown tools shown in the drawing. Use them to push the retaining studs inside and jerk the plug slightly until the studs are disengaged from the holes in the receiver walls. Then pull the plug out with a gentle jerking motion, alternatively clockwise and counterclockwise.

Be careful to avoid a too wide rotation that could distort the main spring rod. Because threading on a lathe is no more difficult than correctly drilling the holes for the studs, use the latter solution only if you absolutely cannot thread the plugs and gun receiver. I used screws to assemble the parts for the prototype, but you can weld or rivet them toget- her. If no milling machine is available, use the preliminary shape shown on drawing Use tool 3 to turn the bolt carrier diameter down to 34 mm. Be careful to prevent any deformation of the receiver during the welding operation.

Start with a plain bar. The first and perhaps biggest difficulty is to drill it straight. Then you have to ream it to a diameter of 8. Then rifle it, cutting two or four grooves with a twist of one turn in about mm 10 Inches. Military barrels during World War II were often made with only two grooves, which proved to be sufficient.

To rifle the barrel you have to build a rifling bank bench , as shown in the accompanying photo. The author operating the rifting bank bench. To drive the cutting tool, I cast a lead slug around the notched part of a rifle cleaning rod inside the bore of the guide barrel. After testing the hook-type rifling head described in the above-mentioned book, I made an improved rifling head, shown in drawing , that is easier to build and operate. To use it, begin with the depth-controlling nut screwed into its foremost position, which brings the cutting tool Into its lowest position.

Unscrew the nut until the cutter comes in contact with the barrel wall. Then pull the cutter completely through the barrel and push it back. Remove the cutter from the upper slot and insert it in the lower slot. Pull the cutter through the barrel again and push it back. Then unscrew the nut one-quarter of a turn; this will allow the cutter to go 0. Then remove the cutter from the lower slot and insert it in the upper one. Repeat these operations until the desired groove depth is obtained.

For a 9mm Parabellum barrel, the groove diameter will be 9 mm to 9. By using the same cutter with the same depth control for both grooves, you are sure to obtain a perfectly symmetrical rifling. After the bore is rifled, it should be lapped to remove any chips left from the tools. Push the slug almost all the way out of the bore and coat it with a mixture of oil and fine emery flour. The unoccupied portion of the bore should also be coated with oil through the opposite end.

A stop should be inserted in each end of the barrel tc insure against accidentally pushing or pulling out the lapping plug. This plug should never be removed from the bore until its work is finished. After the lap is removed, the barrel should be cleaned thoroughly with gasoline and patches and then examined. If more lapping is needed, the old lap should be melted off the rod and a new one made.

Do not try to put the old lap back in the barrel. The only thing you must do is add another front plug to which the silencer can be affixed. Two different silencer versions are presented here. They are both compromise solutions incorporating known principles, and both were tested and found to be reasonably effective. In a noisy environment, such as a big city, most bystanders wouldn't even be aware that someone had fired. A silencer is useful for testing the gun without alarming the neighbors, but Its main purpose is for commando-style operations or assassinations.

Therefore, most countries either forbid their citizens to own silencers or severely restrict their ability to do so. So be warned again; if you build one. The main working principle is absorption of the propellant gas energy by heating the wire mesh located in the expansion chambers. The middle pressure chamber is my own invention. Its function is to slow down the escaping gasses. It works like an inverted smoke extractor such as those used on tank guns. It is just a suggestion to carry on further research. To remain effective the silencer must be thoroughly cleaned periodically, especially the wire mesh.

Spray carburetor cleaner works well. As with version one, avoid full-automatic fire. The lightened bolt carrier is made by drilling targe holes through its left side. Such silencers are a little more complicated to build, but they are more effective and easier to maintain. A poor man was working in a plant named Sewing Machines, Inc.

After many days his home stock was complete, and he tried to assemble the machine for his wife. He tried many times, but he always ended up with a machine gun. A clandestine resistance organization needs considerable quantities of weapons. The importation of complete guns may be difficult and costly, and a single police operation may undo months of effort.

The method suggested here consists of a decentralized mass production of harmless metallic pieces that may be used for various purposes. All machining operations requiring heavy machine tools are completed at this stage. The parts are then dispersed in several small workshops where they can be completed without special tools or skilled labor. COVER The clandestine organization needs efficient cover to buy large quantities of metallic components without alarming the authorities.

The only way to do this is to control at least three small or middle- sized industrial plants used for subcontracting work and with a regular output of some kind of mechanical devices. You must have a net of interconnecting enterprises devoted to the decentralized production of mechanical devices. The idea is that the orders and movements of the gun components will be completely hidden in a stream of civilian goods. It is also assumed that you observe all the basic rules of security for a clandestine organization.

The springs used in the gun are good examples of such pieces, as are the plugs and support rings. Other components are to be made in two steps. First a bar is machined to the correct profile in an industrial factory. The longer the bar, the better the camouflage.

These bars are then dispersed to the smaller workshops, where they are cut like an Italian salami. The receivers and trigger mechanism housings are taken from commercial steel tubes and U iron, which appear innocuous. Fortunately, this phase is done quickly, even in small workshops. For your security, you must remove the pieces from the workshop as soon as they are machined. The pistol grip, either in its metallic-and-wood or plastic version, is a compromising piece.

You have to build it in a secure place. The barrel is the most critical part of the process. For accuracy, a gun must be rifled. As indicated above, it is possible to rifle a barrel with primitive tools, but this is inadequate for a large-scale production. You must therefore find a way to smuggle industrial barrels. I recommend importing finished barrels whose cartridge chambers have already been machined. To smuggle these components, it is wise to use the ant strategy; i.

It will minimize the loss in case of interception and deflect suspicion of a large-scale operation. Barrels can be easily concealed in metallic pipes, imported as bars, or hidden in a truck chassis. Final assembly should also be done in a secure place. Since the quality of manufacture is very difficult to control under clandestine conditions, only after the final assembly will it be possible to test whether the guns work or not.

For the prototype, I used the following solution. Resin-impregnated glass fabric formed the front and inner sidee of the grip, and the wooden side plates were epoxied onto it. The separation between the two wooden halves was left free, so the finished grip could open like an oyster at its rear side see Illustration G. Finish it with a rasp and a buffer. The retainer screw acts also as axis pin for the magazine latch. To drill its location, put the wooden left side plate in place on the pistol grip and use the axis pin holes as guides.

Proceed the same way for the right side. Now you have to drill the recesses for the screw head on the right half and for the nut on the left half. I suggest using a self-locking nut. Group 6: Sights Drawing through The front and rear sights are both made out of the same basic module. To build the basic module you need a U-shaped steel profile 20 x 20 mm, 2 mm thick. You can also make it out of 20 x 20 mm square steel tube. Bend the metal strip with the help of tool 4.

Mark the position for the rivets on the strip and drill them. You must ensure a tight adjustment around the tube. Then rivet the two pieces together. The parts specific to the front and rear sights are very simple and are self-explanatory. The front sight is assembled on the gun. Caution: This screw should not protrude inside the receiver. The rear sight assembly is made according the same principles. Group 7: Folding Stock Drawing through The folding stock is made out of commercial square tubes.

The only difficulty is that the stock itself must slide smoothly into the rear tube, but not be loose. The stock should engage the retaining stud when pushed in its foremost position. Releasing it will let it return under spring pressure and be locked.

The Submachine Gun

When firing at the hip, the shooter uses the stock butt as a foregrip. Group 8: Handguard and Front Grip Drawing and These parts may be made either from hardwood or some kind of plastic material. Drawing shows one of the simplest and easiest wooden solutions. You may, of course, choose another better-looking one, which would require more time to manufacture.

As for the pistol grip, I suggest reinforcing the inner surfaces with glass bedding. Tool 2 Drawing This tool is only necessary if you have no milling machine.

HOME WORKSHOP GUNS FOR DEFENSE & RESISTANCE, VOL. V by Bill Holmes

Use hard plastic, as indicated, or hardwood for the block. Fasten the steel liner to the block with epoxy or similar adhesive. Tool 3 Drawing This device is useful for the fourth construction step of the bolt carrier. You may use brass instead of steel. You will test the ignition with primer. Use a fired cartridge case resized with an appropriate reloading tool. Primers are commercial reloading components. It is to be used with the help of a heavy vise.

Use the spacers T8 to position the sear and trigger assembly. When the mechanism works correctly, assemble it in the trigger mechanism housing and pistol grip assembly. With the selector at the rear position, it should be impossible to move the trigger. With the selector at the middle position, you pull the trigger and the disconnector lowers the sear until it is brought back out of engagement; the sear then springs up.

With the selector at the foremost position, you pull the trigger all the way back. The disconnector remains engaged to the sear. Now assemble the trigger mechanism housing to the receiver without the bolt and barrel. Looking from the front of the body, observe the sear. As you pull the trigger with the selector in both semiauto or full-auto position the sear should completely clear the bolt way, but return high enough to catch the bolt once the trigger is released or the disconnector disengaged.

If necessary, adjust the sear. Then assemble the gun completely, with bolt and barrel. Retract the bolt to its firing position. With the selector set at serriiaulo, pull the trigger to lei Uie bolt fly forward and, without releasing it, pull the bolt handle all the way back. The bolt should remain to the rear. If you release the trigger, it will return to the firing position, and, if you puli it again, the bolt will fly forward. If the selector is set at full auto, the bolt will not remain at the rear during that operation.

Load one inert dummy cartridge in the magazine and fire. The gun should chamber the round smoothly. Sharply pull the bolt handle all the way back, and the round should fly away through the ejection port. Inspect the case for any abnormal sign of wear; for example, on the rear face where the extractor snaps on the cartridge head. Once the gun feeds and ejects inert rounds correctly, test it with primer-only dummy rounds. These rounds are useful to test the ignition process in the workshop, without necessitating a trip to the shooting range.

Top right Accuracy teshng at the shooting range. Right Testing at 25 meters at the range. When selecting a place to test the gun with live rounds, you must pay attention to the ordinary security measures usual with handgun shooting. Keep in mind also that any submachine gun recoils during full-auto fire and that the bullets tend to go to the right and up. The cap will be crushed by the firing pin before the round is fully cham- bered.

Small brass particles will fly through the ejection px rt. You must wear pro- tective goggles and keep any bystanders away from the right side of the gun. First load only one round, set the selector at semiauto, aim. If all works correctly, the gun will fire, the empty case will be ejected, and the bolt will remain to the rear. Above: Results of five shots shoulder-fired on semiauto In 10 seconds at a distance of 25 meters.

If the gun fails to fire, check and eventually modify the firing pin or the extractor. If the bolt is not caught by the sear, check the trigger mechanism again see above. Determine what is causing the malfunction and make the necessary modifications. If everything worked correctly with a single round, load three cartridges.

Fire them on semiauto. Try with five rounds and then a full magazine. Be careful: there is a small risk that the amount of friction generated by the magazine spring under full pressure will not allow the bolt to travel far enough to the rear to be caught by the sear; the gun will then fire some rounds at full auto. If that happens, modify the gun by thoroughly polishing the underpart of the bolt and the contact surfaces of the bolt carrier.

The moving parts should be well lubricated. When the gun functions correctly at semiauto, test it at full auto, first with a few rounds and then with a full magazine. MAGAZINE Because magazines may come from various manufacturers and may be in questionable condition, test the gun with many of them and discard those that cause problems.

The elevation is corrected by screwing or unscrewing the Allen screw that acts as front sight. Side deviation is corrected by laterally displacing the L-shaped back sight. I suggest a rough adjustment at 10 meters and a fine tuning at 25 or 50 meters. Once adjusted, the back sight is secured by the self-locking nut, and the front one by a drop of epoxy.

In fact, It is probably an illegal fighting weapon that should be hidden most of the time. The only thing that you must do is to treat the metal and wooden parts to protect them against humidity and rust. Unless the wood is very dense, a filler should be use to fill the 25 pores. After drying, the excess filler is removed with fine sandpaper. To treat the wood, then apply protective oil or another currently available high-quality product according to the manufacturer's directions. Until recently, paint was seldom used for firearms, but now more and more military weapons are protected with new very resistant synthetic coatings.

I highly recommend using paint because of the wide availability of high-quality and relatively cheap commercial products. For the prototypes I used a black high-temperature-resistant paint designed for automobile exhaust pipes. The paint was also resistant to the lubricating grease and oil used on the gun. You may choose between the bluing process, which creates a microscopic sheet of black ferrous oxide, and phosphatization, which gives gray iron- phosphate. If you prefer a conversion coating, please refer to Appendix B.

There are any number of books that tell how to fashion a sling, so there is no need to provide instructions here. A leather or nyhn sling may be added. The removal of these plugs is not as easy as with threaded ones. To do it you will need the takedown tools shown in the drawing. Use them to push the retaining studs inside and jerk the plug slightly until the studs are disengaged from the holes in the receiver walls. Then pull the plug out with a gentle jerking motion, alternatively clockwise and counterclockwise.

Be careful to avoid a too wide rotation that could distort the main spring rod. Because threading on a lathe is no more difficult than correctly drilling the holes for the studs, use the latter solution only if you absolutely cannot thread the plugs and gun receiver. I used screws to assemble the parts for the prototype, but you can weld or rivet them toget- her.

If no milling machine is available, use the preliminary shape shown on drawing Use tool 3 to turn the bolt carrier diameter down to 34 mm. Be careful to prevent any deformation of the receiver during the welding operation. Start with a plain bar. The first and perhaps biggest difficulty is to drill it straight. Then you have to ream it to a diameter of 8. Then rifle it, cutting two or four grooves with a twist of one turn in about mm 10 Inches. Military barrels during World War II were often made with only two grooves, which proved to be sufficient. To rifle the barrel you have to build a rifling bank bench , as shown in the accompanying photo.

The author operating the rifting bank bench. To drive the cutting tool, I cast a lead slug around the notched part of a rifle cleaning rod inside the bore of the guide barrel. After testing the hook-type rifling head described in the above-mentioned book, I made an improved rifling head, shown in drawing , that is easier to build and operate. To use it, begin with the depth-controlling nut screwed into its foremost position, which brings the cutting tool Into its lowest position. Unscrew the nut until the cutter comes in contact with the barrel wall.

Then pull the cutter completely through the barrel and push it back. Remove the cutter from the upper slot and insert it in the lower slot. Pull the cutter through the barrel again and push it back. Then unscrew the nut one-quarter of a turn; this will allow the cutter to go 0. Then remove the cutter from the lower slot and insert it in the upper one. Repeat these operations until the desired groove depth is obtained. For a 9mm Parabellum barrel, the groove diameter will be 9 mm to 9.

By using the same cutter with the same depth control for both grooves, you are sure to obtain a perfectly symmetrical rifling. After the bore is rifled, it should be lapped to remove any chips left from the tools. Push the slug almost all the way out of the bore and coat it with a mixture of oil and fine emery flour.

The unoccupied portion of the bore should also be coated with oil through the opposite end. A stop should be inserted in each end of the barrel tc insure against accidentally pushing or pulling out the lapping plug. This plug should never be removed from the bore until its work is finished. After the lap is removed, the barrel should be cleaned thoroughly with gasoline and patches and then examined.

About the Book :

If more lapping is needed, the old lap should be melted off the rod and a new one made. Do not try to put the old lap back in the barrel. The only thing you must do is add another front plug to which the silencer can be affixed. Two different silencer versions are presented here. They are both compromise solutions incorporating known principles, and both were tested and found to be reasonably effective. In a noisy environment, such as a big city, most bystanders wouldn't even be aware that someone had fired.

A silencer is useful for testing the gun without alarming the neighbors, but Its main purpose is for commando-style operations or assassinations. Therefore, most countries either forbid their citizens to own silencers or severely restrict their ability to do so. So be warned again; if you build one.

The main working principle is absorption of the propellant gas energy by heating the wire mesh located in the expansion chambers. The middle pressure chamber is my own invention. Its function is to slow down the escaping gasses. It works like an inverted smoke extractor such as those used on tank guns. It is just a suggestion to carry on further research. To remain effective the silencer must be thoroughly cleaned periodically, especially the wire mesh.

Spray carburetor cleaner works well. As with version one, avoid full-automatic fire. The lightened bolt carrier is made by drilling targe holes through its left side. Such silencers are a little more complicated to build, but they are more effective and easier to maintain. A poor man was working in a plant named Sewing Machines, Inc. After many days his home stock was complete, and he tried to assemble the machine for his wife. He tried many times, but he always ended up with a machine gun. A clandestine resistance organization needs considerable quantities of weapons.

The importation of complete guns may be difficult and costly, and a single police operation may undo months of effort. The method suggested here consists of a decentralized mass production of harmless metallic pieces that may be used for various purposes. All machining operations requiring heavy machine tools are completed at this stage.

The parts are then dispersed in several small workshops where they can be completed without special tools or skilled labor. COVER The clandestine organization needs efficient cover to buy large quantities of metallic components without alarming the authorities. The only way to do this is to control at least three small or middle- sized industrial plants used for subcontracting work and with a regular output of some kind of mechanical devices.

You must have a net of interconnecting enterprises devoted to the decentralized production of mechanical devices. The idea is that the orders and movements of the gun components will be completely hidden in a stream of civilian goods. It is also assumed that you observe all the basic rules of security for a clandestine organization. The springs used in the gun are good examples of such pieces, as are the plugs and support rings. Other components are to be made in two steps. First a bar is machined to the correct profile in an industrial factory.

The longer the bar, the better the camouflage. These bars are then dispersed to the smaller workshops, where they are cut like an Italian salami. The receivers and trigger mechanism housings are taken from commercial steel tubes and U iron, which appear innocuous. Fortunately, this phase is done quickly, even in small workshops.

For your security, you must remove the pieces from the workshop as soon as they are machined. The pistol grip, either in its metallic-and-wood or plastic version, is a compromising piece. You have to build it in a secure place. The barrel is the most critical part of the process. For accuracy, a gun must be rifled. As indicated above, it is possible to rifle a barrel with primitive tools, but this is inadequate for a large-scale production. You must therefore find a way to smuggle industrial barrels. I recommend importing finished barrels whose cartridge chambers have already been machined.

To smuggle these components, it is wise to use the ant strategy; i. It will minimize the loss in case of interception and deflect suspicion of a large-scale operation. Barrels can be easily concealed in metallic pipes, imported as bars, or hidden in a truck chassis. Final assembly should also be done in a secure place. Since the quality of manufacture is very difficult to control under clandestine conditions, only after the final assembly will it be possible to test whether the guns work or not.

Therefore, you must have a place to fire the guns, without alarming the neighborhood, with an adjacent workshop to make the final corrections. An important element in this production scheme is the distribution of jigs and tools to the various manufacturers, especially for the small pieces. Make a master form. You may use wood, wax, clay, or any other easy-to-form material. The pistol grip is to be made in two parts. Make a mold in two parts and use it to reproduce as many copies of the master as you want. Use a suitable silicone rubber elastomer. Preparation — Prepare a box or simple frame for the mold.

Bedding — Place the object in modeling clay. Positioning — Make a few 3- or 4-mm holes in the modeling clay to enable you to put the halves of the mold together. Put in a tube about the width of a pencil for the feeder channel. Another tube is necessary to evacuate the air. Pouring the first half — Catalyze the silicone rubber and pour it into the mold.

Walt for the elastomer to cure. Pouring the second half — Catalyze the silicone rubber and pour it into the mold. Wait for the elastomer to cure. The mold is now ready. In this country the phosphatizing process Parkenzation has been more widely used for steel military weapons. These tanks must not be galvanized, and the seams should be welded, not brazed or soldered.

For a heat source, use gas burners. Because grease is the worst enemy of the iron surface conversion process, be sure not to touch the pieces with your fingers. Use boiled cotton gloves or surgical rubber gloves. Make small wire- screen baskets to handle the small pieces. Also prepare iron wire holders to suspend the large pieces, such as the barrel, receiver, trigger housing, and magazine housing. Always work in a well-ventilated working place or in the open. Hot-Salt-Bath Bluing This is a quick, professional process recommended for bluing a largo number of piecoG.

However, because it uses highly caustic chemicals, it does require strict adherence to safety precautions to avoid accidents. It is highly caustic and hazardous to the skin and the eyes. Warning: Bluing should never be done if sulfur is present. This bath is very aggressive and will destroy solder, silver solder, copper, brass, aluminum, zinc alloys, and organic materials. The parts must first be thoroughly polished and degreased e. Methyl ketone Is a fair substitute for TCE.

After acid etching, the parts should be thoroughly rinsed in distilled water. If the temperature rises, add a small amount of water; allow some to boil away if the temperature gets too low. Bluing Is done by immersing the thoroughly degreased parts in the bath for about 30 minutes. After bluing, the parts are rinsed in hot pure water. Warning: The description above contains only the main steps of the process. Amateurs should not work with these dangerous chemicals without aid of further references or more experienced helpers.

Books describing the entire practical process are given in the Bibliography. Parts are polished, degreased, and eventually acid-etched as in the hot-salt bluing process. Bluing is done in a sheet-metal tank, large enough to immerse the largest parts of the gun. The tank will be filled three-fourths full of water and placed over a heat source that will keep it at a hard, rolling boil.

A wide-mouthed jar should be placed near the tank, provided with a clean cotton swab on the end of a wood dowel. Some of the bluing solution is placed in the jar. The gun parts are placed in the tank and boiled for perhaps 15 minutes. When they are that hot, remove one part at a time, keeping it very clese te the tep ef the tank. Swab it all ever with the bluing formula, using long, uniform strokes. As quickly as the solution dries, immerse that part in the tank. Repeat this on all parts. Then remove each part in turn from the tank and use a wad of steel wool to lightly remove any rust that has formed.

Repeat the entire process approximately eight times, or until all parts have taken on a uniform dark-blue color. Finally, boil the parts thoroughly in a bath of distilled water and then dry and oil them. Warning: nitrates and chlorates are oxidizing chemicals that may be used to prepare explosives. Mercury is a heavy metal and a dangerous pollutant. For these reasons, the above chemicals are difficult to obtain without authorization in many countries. The pans are cleaned and eventually sandblasted to provide them with a dull nonreflecting finish.

The phosphatizing solution is heated to the boiling point and kept at a gentle boil. The parts are immersed for about 30 minutes or more to obtain the desired color. Place the parts in boiling water to clean them. Remove, dry, and coat the parts with a good gun oil or rust-inhibiting oil. Use a commercially available solution and work according to the directions, which may be slightly different than the description given above.

Pour milliliters of percent phosphoric acid H3PO4 in milliliters distilled water. Heat the solution and add as much manganese carbonate MnC03 as it will dissolve. Mix 30 milliliters of this solution with 1 liter of distilled water to obtain the final phosphatizing solution. Phosphatizing is done by boiling the parts in this solution until the desired color is obtained usually 30 to 60 minutes.

Maintain the proper concentration by adding water to compensate for evaporation. Before using them pay attention to the following points: 1. Use photocopies instead. If necessary modify the enlargement factor. Receiver with barrel and main spring Total: 22 pieces 2. Bolt Total: 1 7 pieces 3.


  • Firearms - Bill Holmes - Home Workshop .22lr Machine Pistol?
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  • Full text of "Do It Yourself Submachine Gun Gerard Metral Paladin Press".

Trigger mechanism housing Total: 1 6 pieces 4. Trigger mechanism Total: 21 pieces 5. Pistol grip Total: 8 pieces 6. Sights Total: 18 pieces 7. Folding stock Total: 21 pieces 8. Oil Part No. Bll, B12, B G8 Steel 1. S7 and S8 — 7 — Froni; sight 1 : 1 locking spring and spring rest Fll and F12 Hobbart, F. Pictorial History of the Sub-Machine Gun. London: Ian Allan Ltd. Hogg, Ian V. Holmes, Bill. Boulder, CO: Paladin Press, MacFarland, H. Introduction to Modern Gunsmithing. Harrisburg, PA: Stackpole Books, Machu, Willi.

Die Phosphatierung. Weinhein; Verlag Chemie, Paladin Press. Home Workshop Silencers I. Boulder, CO: Paladin Press, 1 Skochko, L. Silencers, Principles, and Evaluation, Report R American Ordnance Publications, Smith, W. Smalt Arms of the World. He is a captain in the Swiss army reserves, where his specialty is artillery He also has extensive training in mechanics anc computer science, which prepared him to create the machinist's drawings that accompany this text.

M6tra has been a gun collector since the age of